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Posts tagged ‘OASIS’

Georgia blacks make strong gains in premature death rates; rural white females losing ground

As we’ve noted in various previous posts, Georgia’s premature death rate (known formally as Years of Potential Life Lost before age 75, or YPLL 75) has been improving fairly steadily over the 20 years that the state’s Department of Public Health (DPH) has been compiling pertinent data.[1]  Between 1994 and 2013, the state’s YPLL 75 rate improved from 9,195.6 to 7,104.7, a gain of 19.4 percent.  The national median, as reported the Robert W. Johnson Foundation in its latest County Health Rankings, was 7,681, so Georgia is doing a little better than the nation as a whole.

But, as we’ve noted in past posts, Georgia’s improvement has been far from even; we’ve focused in particular on regional differences and the dramatic gap in YPLL 75 performance between Metro Atlanta and the rest of the state.  Until now, however, we haven’t looked at racial or gender comparisons, and that produces a couple of interesting headlines.  One is that the vast majority of gains in premature death rates between 1994 and 2013 have been made in the black population.  The other is that rural white females are losing ground.  Read more

Is Rural Georgia Dying? Literally?

A basic premise of Trouble in God’s Country is that rural Georgia is dying.  Truth is, I’ve meant that figuratively rather than literally – a reference to local economies gutted by globalization and other factors, failing schools and small hospitals in danger of closing, among other things.

Recently, however, I read an article that made passing reference to the growing number of rural counties across the country where deaths outnumber births.  I wondered if that might be the case in Georgia.

A quick dive back into the Georgia Department of Public Health’s (DPH) OASIS system produced some pretty startling results. Read more

The High Cost of Premature Death

Here at the Partner Up! for Public Health campaign, we’re always looking for ways to illustrate the high cost of poor health.  Recently we began to study the mountains of public health and economic data we’ve collected to see if we could develop a reasonable methodology for putting a price tag on premature death in Georgia.

This is not a new idea, but most of the studies and reports we’ve found rely on complex formulas that most of us can’t understand and produce results that people have trouble relating to.  Truth is, those are easy traps to fall into; it’s difficult to deal with data without dealing with data.  One formula we found looked like this: Read more